Tag Archives: acrylic painting

Cutting it fine.

I’m heading off to Newcastle to visit my father-in-law tomorrow and have just about finished my “to do” list. This post is the last thing left ( besides putting my jammies in the bag).

One of the jobs has been nagging me all week. I entered 5 paintings in a charity art exhibition for next weekend some time ago, and I only had 4 of them painted. Still, there was plenty of time, so I didn’t feel too rushed. Suddenly I had a complex commission to do and the days sped by, next thing I knew it was yesterday and no painting started! I primed a canvas late last night and went to bed feeling OK.

Today I’ve been at it all day and finally cleaned my brushes just after dinner, washed down the palette and photographed the end result.

Wetlands 1

 

Messing about with boats.

I painted a small pastel of these wooden boats a few years ago and this week I scaled up a bit and did a 70 x 90 acrylic canvas of the same scene. It took much longer than my usual seascapes because of all the detail in the boats and the mooring ropes. I’m pleased with the finished painting as I think I’ve captured the light on the end of the first two boats which is what first attracted me to the scene. I also like the repetition of the boats and the patterns of their internal wooden ribs. The ropes add some horizontals and vertical accents and the reflections in the mirror like water give a tranquil feeling to the painting.

Here’s a few shots of the painting as it progressed.

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Initial sketch and jetty started.

 

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Jetty finished and the red boat started
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I keep working on the boats and add the first ropes.
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Boats are progressing but there’s still a lot of detail to go!
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All done! The boats are finished, the ropes are added and the reflections complete.

 

 

What tomorrow brought.

After a very frustrating morning dealing with a courier over a UK delivery gone wrong I threw myself into finishing yesterdays painting …. and here it is.

koh-lao-liang

I ‘m pleased with the distant boat  as it gives some perspective and I like the hint of white against all that blue and green.

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But I’m not sure if the foreground water needs something else.

koh-lao-liang-cliffs .. and the trees were a bit of a trial!

koh-lao-liang-treesLove to hear what you think of it.

Capo Testa Sardinia- the next painting

Had a clear weekend so gessoed up a canvas and did my second painting in the Sardinia series. Capo Testa is  a wonderful area on the north-west coast of Sardinia. There’s a maze of walking tracks amongst the huge boulders and so many  wildflowers it’s like a series of rock gardens. There’s the mild scent of curry wafting over the cape from the yellow curry plants and the stunning blue of the Mediterranean in the background. Hope I managed to capture just a little of this amazing place which I hope to get back to some day.

Acrylic painting Capo Testa Sardinia
Capo Testa Sardinia. Acrylic painting
Sardinia Capo Testo 3
Capo Testa Sardinia Acrylic Painitng
Sardinia Capo Testo 4
Capo Testa – wildflowers
Sardinia Capo Testo 2
Capo Testa Sardinia

Sardinian coast painting.

I had a painting day today and broke out the acrylics for a change. I’ve been doing a lot of pastels lately and although I love them sometimes I crave the luxury of slathering on thick wodges of paint and building up some texture.

sardinia. Acrylic painting
Sardinian coast. Acrylic painting on canvas

I had a lot of fun with the foreground using some modelling paste mixed with the paint to give volume and texture to all that vegetation. The Queen Anne’s Lace was all over the island with flower heads the size of dinner plates in some places! I took a bit of liberty with some of the flowers so I could harmonise the painting but there were a lot of coastal blooms all around Sardinia.

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I like how the red underpainting shows through in places giving the painting a bit of zing.

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Another joy of acrylics on canvas is that I can continue the painting around the sides , put in a couple of d rings, wire it up and straight onto the wall. No tedious mat cutting and then having to put the pastel in and out of the frame half a dozen times because I keep seeing a speck of dust that’s fallen on the mat – it always happens no mater how careful I am!

This one’s for an upcoming exhibition and I’m thinking it might not come home. All in all a satisfying days work.

Winter sledding- capturing movement.

I’m having a bit of a snow theme lately with my commission work! My client asked me to capture the excitement and movement in this winter sledding scene.  It was a bit of a challenge for me as I’ve only ever painted dogs once before….but then that’s one of the reasons I do commission work– for the challenge of subjects outside my usual comfort zone!

Creating movement

As with any painting I can see areas that are less than perfect but there are also passages I’m quietly pleased with. I like the sense of movement from the different leg positions of the running dogs, the way the fur on the lead dog is being swept back by the wind and the lolling tongues that suggest they’ve been running hard. The lead husky looks a bit wolf like but that’s really how he looked in the reference photos!

Huskies in harness
Huskies in harness

Research always helps

I did a bit of research on husky sled harnesses so I could understand how the harness wrapped around their bodies as it was difficult to tell in the reference photo – this really made it easier to paint the fur as it moved around and over the harness.

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I was saved the problem of painting facial likeness by the fantastic reflective visors! I like the way the man is leaning as they round the corner – it helps that feeling of movement. I added the flakes of falling snow for another touch of movement and a feeling of cold and fun as they sled through the swirling snow.

Practice makes perfect

So now I’m going to practice some dog portraits – I’m determined to get better! A workmate has clumber spaniels and St Bernards so I’ve offered her a portrait if she will give me an honest critique. I wonder how that will go?

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Snow – a winter challenge.

I’ve just completed a commission for a client and really enjoyed painting a snowy scene for a change, despite it’s challenges. Living this far south ( 42 degrees ) you would think I might see a lot of snow in our Tasmanian winters but the truth is it’s pretty mild here. It snows in the mountains but rarely at our house near Hobart and so I don’t often paint a winter scene with snow.

Snowy river reference
Reference photo for the commission

This is the photo my client sent me to work from. It’s a good composition with strong leading lines created by the curving river and the leaning trees – although the river has got a bit of a downward slope that will need correcting. There’s dramatic contrast between the light snow , the dark river and the exposed rocks and bare branches with some mid tones in the background trees.

What’s lacking is colour. The photo has flattened out all the colours into an almost black and white rendition of the scene. This makes for a very stark and cold feeling. “What’s wrong with that”, I hear you say. “After all it is winter and snow is surely cold!”  Surprisingly snow is not just white. Light hits the snow crystals and reflects back creating blues, violets,pinks as well as the expected whites. Then there will be dips and hollows creating strong shadows.

I decided I wanted to go for that sparkly winter feel. I created a  cool blue sky as a back drop to the sparkling snow. I used reflected colours from the sky and snow to  create more interest in the river and then changed the lighting direction to create a shadowed bank on the right so I could introduce violets, mauves and blues into the snowbank. The stronger directional lighting also allowed me to better define the river banks with the shadows of the tree trunks which also break up the expanse of snow. Lastly I injected a bit of warmth in the background trees with some ochres and yellows. This works really well because yellow and blue are complimentary colours  so the trees play off against the sky and the river creating a bit of a zing.2

Here you can see the painting and the photo side by side. It’s always a challenge when I change a photo for a more artistic interpretation to make sure that I keep the essence there for the client.

I’m happy with the changes – let’s see what my client thinks!

Winter river.
Winter River

This is what my client had to say “Wow it’s beautiful! I absolutely love it. It’s going to be my mom’s mothers day gift : )”

A happy client makes for a happy day!